Best Albums Of The...



The Boatman's Call (1997)

Nick Cave
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Post-punk, Alternative rock

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The Boatman's Call is the tenth studio album by Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds, released in 1997. The album, which is entirely piano-based and a departure from the band's post-punk catalogue, remains one of the most critically acclaimed releases of Nick Cave's career.
Recording for the album began at Sarm West Studios in London, United Kingdom in mid-1996, with "The Garden Duet", one of the album's outtakes, being the first song recorded. Though the bulk of The Boatman's Call was recorded at Sarm West, further recordings — including overdubs — were later done at Abbey Road Studios.
Musically, the album's tone is considered sombre and minimalist and marks a major departure for Cave and The Bad Seeds. Moving away from full-band arrangements and character-based narratives, the album's music and lyrics move towards the more intimate sound of Cave's solo voice accompanied by piano or a few other instruments. The tempo is also generally slow, reflecting many of the moods of the songs. Many of the lyrics seem to reflect on Cave's personal relationships and spiritual yearnings at the time of writing. Some songs are thought to be directed at either the mother of Cave's youngest son Luke,

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Tracks

4:14 Into My Arms
5:46 Where Do We Go Now But Nowhere?
4:06 Brompton Oratory
5:33 Far From Me
4:21 Idiot Prayer
4:14 Black Hair
3:34 Green Eyes
4:52 There Is a Kingdom
2:45 West Country Girl
2:56 Lime Tree Arbour
4:06 (Are You) The One That I’ve Been Waiting For?
5:42 People Ain’t No Good
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The black-clad bard strips down to bare essentials.